forum.dwylbtzle.info Forum Index
forum.dwylbtzle.info Forum Index
forum.dwylbtzle.info
FREE-RANGE FLOYD-FREAK ASYLUM
 
 FAQFAQ   SearchSearch   MemberlistMemberlist   UsergroupsUsergroups   RegisterRegister 
 ProfileProfile   Log in to check your private messagesLog in to check your private messages   Log inLog in 

We did it! 3of4 Cannabis initiatives passed in Hailey, Idaho
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10  Next
 
Post new topic   Reply to topic    forum.dwylbtzle.info Forum Index -> Everything Else
View previous topic :: View next topic  
Author Message
Dwylbtzle



Joined: 26 Jan 2007
Posts: 4483
Location: Sun Valley, Idaho

PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 2:30 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

here's one Ryan got in The papers just before the election:

OPED: Arguments Against Pot Proposal Off Base


Ryan Davidson
Novmber 2, 2007Idaho Mountain Express
In Wednesday's Mountain Express, Hailey City Attorney Ned Williamson demonstrates yet another sad example of how the government tries to improperly interfere with the initiative process. Municipalities will break laws, bend laws, and selectively enforce laws in order to keep initiatives off the ballot that they disagree with. If that doesn't work, they'll sue initiative proponents, or force initiative proponents to sue them.

Once in court, campaign funds can be slowly bled off through years of litigation, while the city gets to use the unlimited resource of tax dollars. If the government fails in court, the next step is to have public officials — using their official titles to give their misrepresentations legitimacy — slander initiative proponents in the press in an attempt to mislead citizens into voting against the initiative. It's the whole "kill the messenger" routine. It looks like that's what stage of the game we're in now. Once the initiatives pass, the next step will most likely include the city violating the will of the people by repealing the initiatives, much like the Idaho Legislature did with the term-limits initiative.

The city attorney brazenly declares that if the initiatives pass, there will be a lawsuit to challenge them, because "legalizing marijuana is in violation of state code." It's obvious to me that he hasn't even read the initiatives. For instance, the "Tax and Regulate" initiative doesn't actually legalize marijuana. It calls for the creation of a community oversight committee to examine ways that marijuana could be regulated in Hailey. The committee must hold public hearings and take public testimony on the issue. After a year, they will present their recommendations to the City Council. There's nothing to stop the committee from coming up with an ordinance that would be non-binding, or effective only when the Legislature changes its laws. The overriding goal with these initiatives, of course, is to send a loud and clear message to the state that the people of Hailey demand changes to the marijuana laws.

The city attorney's pronouncement that a legal challenge will occur also just flat ignores basic legal logic. A citizen only has the right to challenge a city ordinance in court if they are uniquely and particularly harmed by it. None of the four initiatives will harm any citizen. The same logic applies to the state. The attorney general does not spend his time looking though every Idaho city's code books for ordinances that conflict with state code. If he did — by the way — he would have sued Hailey for having an unconstitutional residency restriction for petition circulators.

Which brings me to my final point. The city attorney's phony concern for protection of tax dollars is nothing short of a hypocritical joke. The city has been defending their residency requirement for three years in court (at a tremendous cost to the taxpayers) even though they knew full well that it's a violation of the First Amendment.

_________________

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dwylbtzle



Joined: 26 Jan 2007
Posts: 4483
Location: Sun Valley, Idaho

PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 2:37 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Wow!
finding all sorts of things on google I never even knew about Smile
http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v07/n1258/a10.html

***************************

US ID: Hailey to Vote on Marijuana

URL: http://www.mapinc.org/drugnews/v07/n1258/a10.html
Newshawk: Citizen Initiatives www.drugsense.org/caip
Votes: 0
Pubdate: Tue, 30 Oct 2007
Source: Times-News, The (ID)
Copyright: 2007 Magic Valley Newspapers
Contact: letters@magicvalley.com
Website: http://www.magicvalley.com/
Details: http://www.mapinc.org/media/595
Author: Jared S. Hopkins,Times-News writer
Bookmark: http://www.mapinc.org/pot.htm (Marijuana)
Bookmark: http://www.mapinc.org/mmj.htm (Marijuana - Medicinal)
Bookmark: http://www.mapinc.org/topic/industrial+hemp
Bookmark: http://www.mapinc.org/decrim.htm (Decrim/Legalization)
Bookmark: http://www.mapinc.org/states/ID/ (Idaho)


HAILEY TO VOTE ON MARIJUANA

Even If Measure Passes, Possibility of Lawsuits Lingers

When Hailey voters go to the polls next week they'll have an opportunity to light up a whole new Rocky Mountain high.

Thanks to an activist who doesn't live there, voters will be asked to cast ballots on four separate but related measures that aim to legalize marijuana use in the Blaine County ski town. If they approve any or all, city and state officials will be handed a difficult and potentially expensive legal problem of how to interpret the will of the people when the people want to do something that is clearly illegal everywhere else.

The initiatives, if approved by voters, would give the city the following directions:

. Allow sale of cannabis in limited use for adults. Sales would be taxed and regulated - like those of tobacco and alcohol - with the city keeping the revenue.

. Exempt patients with doctor recommendations for medicinal marijuana from any law enforcement punishment.

. Establish a policy favorable to the growing of industrial hemp.

. Make personal use of marijuana the city's "lowest law enforcement priority."

Each measure would also create a community panel to help the city push for decriminalization at the state level.

The initiatives were brought by Ryan Davidson, a 30-year-old native of Canada who now lives in Garden City and works as a "patient-safety attendant" at Saint Alphonsus hospital in Boise. Davidson said he's driven by libertarian principles - not a desire to encourage recreational drug use - and that he chose four measures instead of one because voters value different things.

"The overall goal is to send a message to legislators that this is what city of Hailey residents want," he said. Asked if the measures are essentially legalizing marijuana, Davidson said "right, right."

Davidson lived in Hailey for a few months in 2004. He said he chose Hailey for his ballot measures because the resort town - more liberal than most in Idaho - was one of the "easiest places" to get on the ballot.

Under Idaho law, citizens can get questions on a ballot by collecting petition signatures equal to 20 percent of the turnout in the most recent election in that jurisdiction. Hailey's 2005 election had only candidates who were unopposed, leading to an election in which only 85 people voted in a town with a population of nearly 7,000.

That means Davidson needed just 17 signatures on his petition.

Dean Rutherford, a Hailey chiropractor and supporter of Davidson, said Wood River Valley residents are "contemporary thinkers" who understand laws against marijuana are a waste of taxpayers' money. Neither he nor Davidson said they use marijuana themselves.

"It's not that there are more marijuana smokers up here that want to smoke pot legally without interferences. That's the least of the reasons for these initiatives," said Rutherford, who lives outside the city in Blaine County and thus cannot vote in the election. "It's more political. It's more health reasons. It's more societal."

Still, it's unclear how much support Davidson's ballot measure enjoys. Davidson said he hasn't received money for the cause and that his group, the Liberty Lobby of Idaho, is "four or five people."

Three years ago, Davidson submitted pro-marijuana measures on the ballot in Sun Valley, Ketchum and Hailey, but the cities rejected them. Last year, the Idaho Supreme Court found that cities must consider a petition even if the initiatives could be illegal because the courts and voters hold the power to check initiatives.

But should any of the initiatives pass, Hailey could be thrust into a world of legal troubles, primarily because cities cannot overrule state code or federal law - both of which make the provisions of the ballot measures illegal.

City officials cite four potential problem scenarios: the City Council could rescind the ordinance; the city could challenge it in court; a private citizen could challenge it; or the office of Idaho Attorney General Lawrence Wasden could become involved.

"Municipalities do not have the authority to repeal state or federal criminal laws," said Kriss Cloyd, a spokeswoman for the attorney general. "Under state and federal laws, possession of marijuana is a crime."

Hailey City Attorney Ned Williamson said the initiatives bear a "lack of clarity." Hailey Police Chief Jeff Gunter said that if the measure passed he plans to confer with city officials and Williamson before deciding what to do.

"I doubt we'd do anything that's contrary to state law," he said. "This is probably an issue that's going to be litigated quite a bit before we get to that point."

Davidson said he knows there's potential for a legal battle, including one he might initiate if the city redacts ordinances that stem from his measures. He said that it is possible law enforcement agencies or the attorney general might take action "but what the state's going to do, exactly, I don't know."


_________________

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dwylbtzle



Joined: 26 Jan 2007
Posts: 4483
Location: Sun Valley, Idaho

PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 2:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Results 1 - 10 of about 89,300 for marijuana initiative hailey idaho. (0.05 seconds)
http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&ie=ISO-8859-1&q=marijuana+initiative+hailey+idaho&btnG=Google+Search

whoa!
89,300 entries in google for simply:
"marijuana initiative hailey idaho" Shocked

Surprised we're world famous! Smile Cool



Twisted Evil Razz Laughing
_________________

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dwylbtzle



Joined: 26 Jan 2007
Posts: 4483
Location: Sun Valley, Idaho

PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 2:55 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://cannabisnews.com/news/23/thread23477.shtml
Pot Legalization Vote Makes National News
Posted by CN Staff on November 14, 2007 at 07:22:39 PT
By Terry Smith, Express Staff Writer
Source: Idaho Mountain Express

Idaho -- The city of Hailey made national news last week after voters approved three citizen initiatives to reform marijuana laws. Hailey joined Denver as two Western cities having passed pro-marijuana measures on election day, Nov. 6.
The Associated Press moved a story on passage of the initiatives early the following day and Hailey's pro-pot vote was featured in the Wall Street Journal, Times magazine online and numerous other publications. Shocked Smile Twisted Evil Razz Cool Laughing

Meanwhile, Hailey city officials are expected to make an announcement later this week on how they plan to deal with the issue.

"I think largely the announcement will say that the city is examining the legal arguments for implementation," said Hailey City Clerk Heather Dawson.

Hailey voters approved initiatives to legalize medical uses of marijuana, to make enforcement of marijuana laws the lowest priority for law enforcement and to legalize industrial use of hemp, a type of marijuana low in THC, the chemical that produces a high.

Voters turned down a fourth initiative that would have required the city to tax and regulate sales and use of marijuana.

All three of the passed initiatives require the city to lobby other government agencies for reform of marijuana laws.

So what happens next?

The approved initiatives require that the city establish a Community Oversight Committee to work out the details of legalization. But the city has another option it may or may not choose to exercise. The City Council can vote to repeal the initiatives.

Ryan Davidson, chairman of Liberty Lobby of Idaho, and the man who got the marijuana initiatives on the ballot, said Tuesday that he's uncertain what he'll do if the city takes that step. If so, he's considering launching new petition drives to put the initiatives to the voters all over again.

Davidson is also working for initiative elections in Sun Valley and Ketchum.

But for the time being, he's enjoying the victory in Hailey.

"Three out of four is pretty good," Davidson said. "I guess it proves my original instincts that Hailey or the other cities in the Wood River Valley would be one of the easier places to pass this."

Davidson is trying to use the initiative process in the valley as part of a grassroots effort to reform marijuana laws statewide.

"It's kind of in the city's court right now," he said.

Meanwhile, local police still consider possession of marijuana in Hailey and elsewhere a crime. As if to emphasize the point, the Blaine County Narcotics Enforcement Team arrested a Hailey couple on election day for allegedly possessing marijuana with intent to deliver.

Note: City officials examine ramifications of implementation.

Source: Idaho Mountain Express (ID)
Author: Terry Smith, Express Staff Writer
Published: November 14, 2007
Copyright: 2007 Express Publishing, Inc.
Contact: letters@mtexpress.com
Website: http://www.mtexpress.com/

Related Articles:

Hailey Voters Say ‘Yes’ To Marijuana Reforms
http://cannabisnews.com/news/thread23455.shtml

Marijuana Referendum Looms Large in Hailey
http://cannabisnews.com/news/thread23444.shtml

Marijuana Initiative Makes Hailey Ballot
http://cannabisnews.com/news/thread23358.shtml



Home Comment Email Register Recent Comments Help


Comment #5 posted by afterburner on November 14, 2007 at 21:03:37 PT
Political Suicide
"The City Council can vote to repeal the initiatives."
Let us hope that the council members are not that suicidal.

[ Post Comment ]



Comment #4 posted by FoM on November 14, 2007 at 09:00:30 PT
Dongenero
Here's the cartoon link. I like it.
http://www.mtexpress.com/images/07-11-14_cartoon_damn_hippies.jpg

[ Post Comment ]



Comment #3 posted by dongenero on November 14, 2007 at 08:50:09 PT
also on mtexpress.com
is the next above article..."Grass Roost"...and there is a political cartoon on the issue, basically pits Hailey "Hippies" vs. rednecks.

[ Post Comment ]


Comment #2 posted by Truth on November 14, 2007 at 08:45:39 PT
possessing marijuana with intent to deliver
arrested for doing something good? Must be America.

[ Post Comment ]


Comment #1 posted by dongenero on November 14, 2007 at 08:30:03 PT
Good picture of Ryan Davidson.....
if you link to the article on the on the mtexpress.com website.
That's what a fighter for freedom and justice against overbearing, over reaching government looks like.

Good work Ryan! I hope it's only the beginning of your efforts.




_________________

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dwylbtzle



Joined: 26 Jan 2007
Posts: 4483
Location: Sun Valley, Idaho

PostPosted: Mon Nov 26, 2007 3:22 am    Post subject: Reply with quote



Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing Laughing
he heee heeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!
_________________

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dwylbtzle



Joined: 26 Jan 2007
Posts: 4483
Location: Sun Valley, Idaho

PostPosted: Fri Dec 07, 2007 8:34 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.mtexpress.com/index2.php?ID=2005118140#list

Wednesday, November 28, 2007

Pot initiatives pose ‘serious problems’
Hailey City Council delays action on voter-approved reforms


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

By TERRY SMITH
Express Staff Writer

Hailey Councilwoman Carol Brown may have to resign her position because of potential conflicts of interest over three controversial voter-approved marijuana reform initiatives. Brown, a U.S. Forest Service employee, said she is prohibited by federal ethics rules from lobbying or advocating reform of marijuana laws as required by the initiatives. Photo by David N. Seelig



The Hailey City Council has tabled further action on three controversial voter-approved marijuana-reform initiatives until it sees what the Idaho Attorney General's Office has to say about the issue.

"I know that the Attorney General's Office is reviewing this matter," City Attorney Ned Williamson told council members Monday night. Williamson said he didn't know what action Attorney General Lawrence Wasden might take, but speculated that he "may raise objections to the matter."

Bob Cooper, spokesman for the attorney general, confirmed on Tuesday that the Attorney General's Office is looking into the issue.

"We have received a request from the city attorney and we are reviewing the material," Cooper said.

The vote to table the issue was 3-0. Mayor Susan McBryant was absent and Councilwoman Carol Brown recused herself from the discussion, fearing a potential conflict with restrictions of her employment with the U.S. Forest Service.

Hailey voters approved three marijuana reform initiatives on Nov. 6. One would legalize medical use of marijuana, a second would legalize industrial use of hemp and the third would make enforcement of marijuana laws the city's lowest police priority.

The council vote followed a presentation by Williamson in which he pointed out potential legal problems with implementing the initiatives, saying they conflict with both state and federal law and have several other provisions of questionable legality. For instance, he said, provisions of the initiatives that require city officials to lobby for reform of marijuana laws may violate First Amendment guarantees of freedom of speech and political expression.

The marijuana-advocacy provisions are also cause a dilemma for Brown, who said she may have to resign from the council because of ethics rules she is required to follow as a federal employee, under which she is prohibited from lobbying government entities. For the time being, Brown said, she cannot participate in the discussions or even be present when the issue is discussed.



Williamson also pointed out that local government entities do not have the right to pass laws contrary to state law. Furthermore, he said, the "lowest police priority" initiative puts Hailey police in a sticky position, saying they may not be allowed to be deputized for federal law enforcement reasons and may lose out on grant money to enforce drug laws.

"I believe the initiatives do pose some real serious problems," he said

Williamson said the council has four options. It can implement the initiatives, amend them, repeal them or pursue litigation.

Williamson recommended the latter.

"The judiciary can review initiatives for legality," he said. "This is why I think we need to have this litigated. I don't make that recommendation lightly, but the laws as proposed do raise some serious issues."

Councilman Don Keirn said implementation of the initiatives could cause council members to violate their oaths of office, wherein they pledged to uphold federal and state laws.

Councilwoman Martha Burke said she thinks Hailey voters were uniformed on the issues and approved the initiatives without realizing all the ramifications.

Regardless, Council President Rick Davis said he is reticent to repeal the initiatives because it would be "contrary to the voters."

"It is what it is and we have to deal with it," Davis said.



print version email


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Leave a Comment

Show: Sort: Newest first Oldest first
There are 3 comments


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
The comments below are from the readers of mtexpress.com and in no way represent the views of Express Publishing Inc.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

timothy – Islamorada, FL 11/29/07 - 08:48
What about the will of the people?


a former child of hailey – Moscow, ID 11/29/07 - 13:30
The people have spoken and those that are in office have sworn to uphold the will of the PEOPLE. So please city council members, uphold your oaths to the people whom you represent and go forward with the three initiatives, bring them to the state level and put it on the state ballot so that others can also vote on the issues.


roy sandefur – hailey idaho 12/07/07 - 01:33
This has all already been "litigated" for three years
I know--I was there
helping Robert and Ryan fight up through the courts to The Idaho Supreme Court
(where we were vindicated 5-0)
and the Federal Courts

the people were given the chance to voice their opinion

NOW, the job of The Government is to remember they are a GOVERNMENT BY, FOR, AND OF THE PEOPLE

This insane prohibition WILL be ended

Ketchum is next.

_________________

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dwylbtzle



Joined: 26 Jan 2007
Posts: 4483
Location: Sun Valley, Idaho

PostPosted: Fri Dec 07, 2007 9:50 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.mpp.org/news/in-the-news/?state=ID
more news articles
from all over
WE SEEM TO BE IN OVER HALF OF THEM! Twisted Evil Razz Cool Laughing
_________________

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dwylbtzle



Joined: 26 Jan 2007
Posts: 4483
Location: Sun Valley, Idaho

PostPosted: Fri Dec 07, 2007 9:53 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Idaho

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Mellowing Out on Marijuana



Rita Healy
November 8, 2007
Time
Those Rocky Mountains are getting higher. Two municipalities — Denver, Colorado, and the small town of Hailey, Idaho — passed pro-marijuana measures on election day this week, joining a growing number of liberal localities that are reducing or removing penalities on using pot. It's part of a slowly evolving populist rehabilitation of the drug. San Francisco, Oakland and Santa Monica in California, along with Missoula, Montana, and Seattle, Washington, have previously passed laws that give the lowest priority to enforcing existing marijuana laws.

Federal regulations, which supercede local ordinances, continue to prescribe heavy penalties — even in some cases death — for major dealers of illegal drugs, including marijuana. The federal penalty for possession of even a miniscule amount is a misdemeanor punishable by one year in prison and $1,000. Penalties are higher with cultivation, sale and crossing state lines. However, magistrates generally use state and local laws as sentencing guidelines — unless there is federal intervention, which doesn't occur in every drug case because they would increase court time and costs.

Not every attempt at liberalizing the laws has been successful. Last year, the pro-marijuana lobby tried to pass legalization laws in Nevada and Colorado; both failed. But this week's results in Denver heartened pro-pot activists: 57% of voters in the city approved "lowest law enforcement priority." Coming after a 2005 vote removing all penalties for possessing small amounts, Denver joins Alaska to become only the second place in the U.S. offering a free ride to users caught with less than an ounce. Denver's local and political culture has been amenable to such legal re-orientations. Last summer, Denver Mayor John Hickenlooper and four of the 13-member city council told a local newspaper they had smoked pot in the past, while another six councilmen refused to answer and only three said no.

The Denver measure was pushed by a single activist: Mason Tvert, who organized SAFER, Safer Alternative For Enjoyable Recreation, on the University of Colorado and Colorado State University campuses, and now runs it from his Denver home. He was funded in part by the Marijuana Policy Project, which received $3 million this year from Peter Lewis, the heir of the Progressive Insurance Companies, who helps fellow billionaire George Soros support liberal causes.

More remarkable is Tvert's counterpart in Idaho, Ryan Davidson of Boise. Davidson operated without any MPP money after failing to get measures on the ballot in 2004 in a number of Idaho cities. This past year, he got it on Hailey's ballot after winning a ruling in federal district court that overturned Hailey's law preventing nonresidents from circulating petitions. "This was the least funded campaign in history," he says. "I spent maybe 20 bucks. I got the signatures on the petitions on my own dime. I spread the word through e-mail and phone calls and posting on blogs, I printed some fliers off my computer, photocopied them at Kinko's and put them under car windshield wipers on Monday."

Jim Spinelli, executive director of Hailey's Chamber of Commerce, insists there is no grassroots pro-pot movement and expressed surprise that three of four pro-pot measures passed: legalizing medical marijuana and decriminalizing both marijuana itself and industrial hemp. (The only measure that failed asked for a straight-out legalization of marijuana.) A town of 8,500, Hailey is 12 miles from the Sun Valley ski area. When Spinelli worked Tuesday's election, he says he saw a lot of older affluent voters and young people from the service sector. In Idaho, being under the influence of pot in public draws a six-month sentence and $1,000 fine. At least in Hailey, if the local police — as opposed to the state police — handle an arrest, local ordinance will be applied.

In 38 states, incarceration still awaits even first-time offenders possessing small amounts of marijuana. In Connecticut, possessing a "useable amount" is punishable by a year in jail and $1,000 fine. Nevada sends its pot users — possessing any amount — into rehab or treatment and imposes a $600 fee. Federal law calls for a year in jail and $1,000 for anyone caught with any amount. The National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) says there are 65,000-85,000 people incarcerated in this country for cannabis-related reasons.

But NORML spokesman Allen St. Pierre points out that the law is growing increasingly lenient in many other places. In Alaska, there's no jail or fine for holders of an ounce or less in their homes. In Nebraska, possession of less than an ounce is simply a civil citation. In Ohio, no criminal record is kept of a minor misdemeanor, that is, possession of less than 100 grams. Since the 1970s, the home-rule cities of Ann Arbor and Madison — who are allowed by their states to let city regulations supersede state laws for the most part — have simply imposed $25 fines for possession. St. Pierre says NORML and related organizations expect 2008 to be "much busier" for pro-pot activism and referendums. And even though federal law is the final word, St. Pierre says that when campuses, municipalities, counties and states vote, politicians listen. "It speaks to the mores and values of those administering justice. As Tip O'Neill said, 'All politics are local.'"

_________________

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dwylbtzle



Joined: 26 Jan 2007
Posts: 4483
Location: Sun Valley, Idaho

PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2007 9:59 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

BARhar!
Just saw some new comedian
Shane Moss--if I caught the name correctly
on Conan
and he was doing a joke about hearing about "a car that runs on hemp"

but he says he wouldn't wanna buy that car
"Because I know a lot of PEOPLE who run on hemp
and I'm guessing it's pretty unreliable."

Laughing Laughing Laughing

-I THINK WE SHOULD WALKI FERGOT HOW
.......THIS CAR'S A PIECE OF SHIT-
_________________



Last edited by Dwylbtzle on Wed Dec 26, 2007 11:57 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dwylbtzle



Joined: 26 Jan 2007
Posts: 4483
Location: Sun Valley, Idaho

PostPosted: Wed Dec 26, 2007 11:51 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Previous news story wrote:
Jim Spinelli, executive director of Hailey's Chamber of Commerce, insists there is no grassroots pro-pot movement and expressed surprise that three of four pro-pot measures passed: legalizing medical marijuana and decriminalizing both marijuana itself and industrial hemp. (The only measure that failed asked for a straight-out legalization of marijuana.) A town of 8,500, Hailey is 12 miles from the Sun Valley ski area. When Spinelli worked Tuesday's election, he says he saw a lot of older affluent voters and young people from the service sector. In Idaho, being under the influence of pot in public draws a six-month sentence and $1,000 fine. At least in Hailey, if the local police — as opposed to the state police — handle an arrest, local ordinance will be applied.


Laughing Apparently, we're all hallucinatory, non-existant figments of rich, young-looking old busboys' imaginations Rolling Eyes
Razz
_________________

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dwylbtzle



Joined: 26 Jan 2007
Posts: 4483
Location: Sun Valley, Idaho

PostPosted: Mon Dec 31, 2007 11:35 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Election day photos!


First we found a school for slow children


Then, Ryan,--whilst trying to sell the kids porno and joints, found this little baby
and held it down, and blew dope smoke in its face until it turned into this horrifying
radioactive mutated little Gollum creature







While standing on a corner, handing out pamphlets, some girl ran up to
me and said she had a sign in her car, that she had made, and wanted to
have me stand by it, while I handed them out...
So, she went to her car and had this sign in the back...
We thought it said: "Hemp oil for not lives" but, I think I've figured out--that it said "Oil for hemp, not lives"
Confused Rolling Eyes Laughing


Or "Hemp for oil, not lives", maybe--(I don't friggin' know) Confused Question












(The sticker says, "I voted")









Having, thus, just, heroically, ended the war,
we celebrated over at the Simpsons' house in Springfield, an elite suburb of Hailey












This is just the green-eyed, red Christmas kitty
she doesn't smoke pot

_________________



Last edited by Dwylbtzle on Tue Jan 01, 2008 9:29 pm; edited 11 times in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dwylbtzle



Joined: 26 Jan 2007
Posts: 4483
Location: Sun Valley, Idaho

PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 1:58 am    Post subject: Reply with quote


Then, as you see, Homer finally got Ryan ripped on weed, for the very first time....

And he actually finally worked up the courage to pick up a date, in Bruce Willis' tavern...
(also for the first time)...
but it turned out to be a hermaphrodite wrapped in garbage bags and duct tape Mad


_________________

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dwylbtzle



Joined: 26 Jan 2007
Posts: 4483
Location: Sun Valley, Idaho

PostPosted: Tue Jan 01, 2008 4:29 am    Post subject: Reply with quote


_________________

Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dwylbtzle



Joined: 26 Jan 2007
Posts: 4483
Location: Sun Valley, Idaho

PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2008 6:16 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

In a message dated 1/2/2008 9:37:31 A.M. Mountain Standard Time, screech@**********.com writes:
Foesad wrote:
LOL those are great! Who’s the guy campaigning with you? I love the Gollum pics. I recognized Dobby too!



That's Ryan Davidson
he's the former state chairman of the idaho libertarian party
he's the one who did all the legal research
and filed all the lawsuits and official initiatives
so he's the one with his name on every document

thus he's the one who always gets mentoned in all the newspaper reports Evil or Very Mad
Smile Laughing
but the idaho liberty lobby was three initial people
me--ryan--and robert blakeley


yeah
those were people at some thing ryan went to
called NERDFEST
so a bunch of nerdfest pics were on the roll of film that was in the camera when we took the election day photos
the gollum and dobby kids are robert blakeley's
the person in the trash bags
was someone there who said they were ACTUALLY a hermaphrodite

that picture really is a hermaphrodite wrapped in garbage bags and duct tape! Shocked
_________________



Last edited by Dwylbtzle on Wed Jan 02, 2008 6:51 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Dwylbtzle



Joined: 26 Jan 2007
Posts: 4483
Location: Sun Valley, Idaho

PostPosted: Wed Jan 02, 2008 6:37 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

the story about the girl with the sign
was true, too
she just came running up to me and said she had this sign in the back of her car


I never PLANNED to blur the cannabis issue with the war issue
and I don't thik the war is blood, (lives), for oil anyway
unless it's AMERICA's blood for EVERYBODY'S oil
and the sign doesn't go into all that
no room to make that distinction, i guess Laughing
(which i doubt she meant to make, anyway) Confused

--anyway--wot was i spossed to do: tell her we didn't want her crummy
sign because it blurred the issues too much?
couldn't do THAT Sad
poor thing--the only one who made us a sign--other than ourselves
_________________



Last edited by Dwylbtzle on Sun May 29, 2011 12:24 am; edited 1 time in total
Back to top
View user's profile Send private message Send e-mail
Display posts from previous:   
Post new topic   Reply to topic    forum.dwylbtzle.info Forum Index -> Everything Else All times are GMT
Goto page Previous  1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10  Next
Page 5 of 10

 
Jump to:  
You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot vote in polls in this forum


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2005 phpBB Group